Immigrants Advocate While Democrats Infiltrate: Politics As Usual When It Comes To Talks On Immigration Reform

July 18, 2013 2 comments

7:17:13 Day of Action 1Yesterday in Roswell, the Alliance for Peace and Justice, a group of activists promoting equality for Roswell and all New Mexican’s, organized a vigil outside of New Mexico Congressman Steve Pearce’s office.  With over 60 activists in attendance, the Congressman was presented with a letter urging him to support their cause for immigration reform.  In the letter, the Alliance states,

Over the past decade we have doubled the number of border agents and vastly expanded border security spending, and now by every measure our border is more secure. Now a common sense roadmap exists that includes responsible enforcement and a citizenship process making us even safer, and our economy stronger.  To spend any more money militarizing our border would be fiscally irresponsible, and hindering the debate on immigration reform for the sake of ideology would be morally irresponsible.

While the group may not be able to sway the Congressman’s decision to support a pathway to citizenship, yesterday’s day of action gave a great showing of solidarity and support for the ongoing talks happening thousands of miles away in Washington.  But while we’re on that subject of Washington, who is in charge of the fate of 11 million “aspiring” American’s, let’s talk briefly about how politicized this immigration issue has become.

As an activist watching the Senate debate the bill and now urging the House to take action and put the bill up for a vote, I can’t help but wonder about the suspicions I have had about why we’re still talking about this.  I’m usually blaming the Republican’s for the gridlock in Washington, but now I’m not so sure if they’re entirely to blame.

Yesterday’s day of action by the Alliance for Peace and Justice was a vigil to urge Congressman Steve Pearce to support a humane and just bill that allows for a pathway to citizenship for 11 million immigrants already here.  But for a minute during this vigil, the action turned into political theater when local Democrats infiltrated the vigil by campaigning against Congressman Pearce. Here all along, I was worried over the opposition to the issue, nativists and/or Tea Party activists showing up to defend their political puppet, Steve Pearce.  But instead, what we saw was a carnival of self-involved Democrats, jabbering about “democratic values” and ignoring the fact that this was a non-political event, to demonstrate the need for reform for countless immigrants living in our communities here in New Mexico.

7-17 Day of Action 2Although this parade of politicization didn’t last long, it did leave me with a very lasting impression of what I was already struggling to accept, but never wanted to admit to.  When it comes to issues of immigration or any other issue around social justice, neither party really cares.  I’ve been an immigrant activist for 15 years and in all those years, we’ve come so close to reform, but in the end it’s always shot down.  Why is that?  Sure, let’s blame the Republican’s for everything but Democrats are responsible too.

Immigration reform is not a game.  Eleven million aspiring American’s are not here for your political enjoyment.  Our issues are not here to keep you all entertained.  But it sure is keeping you employed, huh?

Democrats:  This is why American’s choose not to vote. This is why your base chooses to sit out important elections like in 2010 and 2012. Realize this when 2014 comes around because you all are going to be given the shock of your life when you lose another major election.

We certainly expect pandering from the right. I guess we should start to expect it from the left as well.

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I’m OK With Oppression, As Long As You Don’t Mess With My Television

July 16, 2013 9 comments

“Today, we have no political or national will to end injustice.” 

The problem with this statement is that there are people in this country who believe that there are no injustices.  Seriously.

But every issue we face as a nation, comes down to some form of discrimination and many just don’t see it that way.  Instead, most see our call of injustices as an excuse.

You can look through my Facebook timeline and you’ll know what I’m talking about.

Growing up in a conservative, rural town in New Mexico, most of the families appeared to have the same things, same experiences. Disparities in wealth, health, etc existed, but as a young child I didn’t see it and no one was really there to tell me otherwise.  It wasn’t until I left for college and graduate school and my work with communities across the country the last fifteen years, that helped me to think critically and see injustices for what they really were.

Yes, we have choices.  But our choices are predetermined by who we are as a people because it is embedded in our society.  Not one person in this country can tell you what justice looks like, because not one person has ever seen it.  While people continue to internalize and justify racism and discrimination, we will never see it, at least not in my lifetime.

Our upbringing didn’t help us either.

During my EMERGE NM class this week, I learned something from our instructor, jona olsson.  It is something I’ve known for a long time, but I could never put it into words.  She couldn’t have put it any other way:

“we are expert scholars in the propaganda our parents taught us.”

Powerful, right?  I mean, really.  Think about that statement for a second.

Not to blame my parents for everything, but we’ve been taught so many things from generations before us, particularly on how we treat other people and how we’re supposed to be treated and we can’t seem to shake it. Thinking about it this weekend, I go back to comments and statements made by family and friends overtime, stereotypes they hold to be true, and it makes me angry. So angry, I choose to not surround myself around that as much as possible. But Saturday night’s verdict in the George Zimmerman trial didn’t do anything to lessen this feeling.

The “Stand Your Ground” law in Florida is the dumbest piece of state legislation I have ever read (we’ll leave Texas law out of this conversation, because Texas is just another freak of nature).  The law is one thing we need to argue about, however to see people sit back and say that Travyon Martin, a young black kid, was not targeted and discriminated against by George Zimmerman, a known violent person and racist, is absolutely outrageous.  The verdict wasn’t so much the surprise, it was the shock and awe I felt from those who decided to come out in support of the murderer’s actions and characterization of Travyon Martin.

With the character assassination of the murdered child, the quote above brought it home to me the night we found out the verdict.  I knew George Zimmerman would not be convicted. I knew because 1) Stand Your Ground is way too broad and 2) our justice system in this country is jacked.  What I was not prepared for, however, was the utter carelessness of loss of life from those around me, especially from communities of color, who were ok with the verdict or did a *shoulder shrug*, like it was no big deal.  Some said, “get over it.”

Get over it?  As a person of color, we are devalued in our country because of who we are; the color of our skin, our language, what we wear and even our name, and yet we defend the system that is built to keep us oppressed?  What the “get over it” people did, was show me that once again, they have drunk the kool-aid of oppression. They actually believe that there is no such thing as injustice in this world and that we each have control of our own destiny and that those with privilege are actually good people and looking out for the best of us. Racism is over. GET OVER IT!

I remember a story my dad tells me and although he means well, when he tells it, it really infuriates me.  My father was a farmworker for all of his life until retirement over a decade ago.  During his career, he worked for a gentleman here in Lake Arthur, New Mexico, a farm owned by a family that my dad had strong ties to. To say that my dad was loyal, is an understatement.  He was so loyal that one day, one of the owners of the farm came by where my dad was burning weeds along the area where he was farming. The owner fell into the burning brush and my father jumped in after him and saved his life.  My dad insisted that this man go to the hospital while my dad stayed behind, letting his own burns heal on their own. The infuriating part about this narrative is that when my dad tells this story, he shares it in a way that makes him nostalgic for those days. You know, the good ole’ days? What he never mentions, or does not want to argue, is that his boss never provided him basic health care, he worked six days a week, from 6a to 6p, and managed acres upon acres of farmland on his own.  When he retired, he was so proud to have learned that his former boss hired three guys to do what he had done on his own!  For him and my family, this “built character.” Sure, it did! But the toll it must have taken on my dad physically. This story also reinforces this mentality that we we don’t deserve to be treated fairly and equally.  So when I bring this up, I’m told to not say more.

It’s just an excuse.

When you pass this farm that my dad managed for so long, it’s no longer the beautiful land he once cultivated. Instead, the land is unkept, without nourishment, and saddens my father each and every time he passes through. The owners of this land are now extremely wealthy, living off the money they made after selling the water rights to the farm my dad worked so hard for.

I love my dad.   I love him because he worked hard to make a better life for me and my family.  But his hard work also lead me to question the system and think critically about what and how we are treated.  We are two very different generations and we see the world differently. What he sees as loyalty and being a good hired hand and worker, I see as an employer taking advantage of a man and exploiting him to get what they could out of him.

When I tell my dad that this is an “injusticia” it aggravates him in the same way others treat the idea of injustice all across this country.

It’s just an excuse.

The murder of Trayvon Martin, the attack on women’s reproductive rights, the nativism we hear and see during immigration debate and the justification we make for “random” acts of violence are consequences of a misogynistic society.  We refuse to see it for what it is:  oppression.

Racism and discrimination may not be as obvious as it was in our history books for many American’s, but to say that it doesn’t happen, especially from people of color, makes it even more impossible to initiate a national or political will to make our society better.

It’s ok to talk about it.  It’s ok to say we have problems in this country and that we need to make necessary steps to figure it all out.  But I worry that we may have to go through a series of challenging events before the “get over it” group finally realize that they were wrong all along.

They came for everyone else and you didn’t care.  Who will be defend you when they come for you?

 

Supporters of Marriage Equality Kick Bigotry In The Ass…Again.

So what do you do when the highest court in the land rules that married same-sex couples are entitled to federal benefits as well as the freedom to marry in states that already allow it? For most cities across the country, you move on, right? I mean, the Supreme Court of the United States of America just made some pretty good and compelling arguments in support of equal rights.    

Well.  In Roswell, New Mexico…issues like this don’t just go away quite as easily, or as quietly, as the rest of the nation.  Earlier this week, many of us got word that the Roswell City Council had been considering a resolution that would define marriage as only between a man and a woman.  Savino Sanchez, Jr, Associate Pastor at Church On The Move, an evangelical church in Roswell, and the Chair of Roswell’s Police Committee, introduced this resolution (despite the higher court’s recent ruling).

Oh!  Did I mention he did not attend tonight’s hearing?

Before tonight, there had been massive confusion regarding the resolution.  Yesterday we heard that it had died in committee, but there was talk that the resolution was still on tonight’s agenda.  To add to even more confusion, only five members of the council showed up tonight and there needed to be six to reach a quorum to resume with the business on the agenda.  

So what was going on exactly?

*scratching head*

Roswell Mayor Del Jurney explained that “due to changes to rules for city hearings, the agenda for tonight’s meeting had to be made public before we had an up or down vote in committee. That is why this resolution was on the tonight’s agenda and will remain on next Thursday’s agenda, but there will be no vote on this resolution. This resolution is dead.”

Great news!  So what are we still doing here?

Mayor Jurney was compelled to hear out the concerns of those present and asked that people who had signed up to speak, should do so tonight, next Thursday or both.  

Roughly, forty community residents were present at tonight’s hearing in support of marriage equality.  One by one, residents from the city of Roswell, provided personal and passionate stories for their support for equal rights.  Allies, such as Sara Mitchell, stood in front of the five council members, visibly disturbed by this resolution.  

Mitchell said, “the reason this resolution angered me was because it is a waste of your time and our time.  This resolution is pointless and is intentionally malicious.”  

Like her, countless other individuals stood up and stood firm, passionately voicing their concerns, mainly in disbelief that something like this could come out of the city of Roswell, a city in which many advocates have grown up in, love dearly, so much so that they’re raising their families here.  How could a city known for its history of embracing the idea of “extraterrestrials” and life on other planets, now have difficulties coming to terms with humans and their love for one another?  

Tonight’s meeting was an inspiration to many advocates across the state.  Mainly because for a community like Roswell, located in a region where you feel like you need a passport to come down here, proved tonight that there are forward thinkers who go to such lengths to make positive change.   

As Sara Mitchell pointed out after the meeting, “I was proud to be in the same room with so many passionate, well spoken, equal rights activists. Whoever put forward this resolution, like-minded people should note that the citizens of Roswell will not let their town become known for hate, ignorance, and marginalization. I don’t need my marriage affirmed at the price of denying others equal rights.”

 

Let’s Militarize the Border, They Said. It Worked for Nation-Building.

Yesterday I participated in a meet and greet with New Mexico State Senator Tim Keller.  I really wanted to write a whole post about that, considering that it’s super rare to get any state-wide candidates or leaders to come down to our region of the state.  However, because of today’s news dump, I realize that the campaign for New Mexico’s Office of State Auditor is going to have to wait awhile.

In addition to the ongoing NSA scandal and the mission impossible chase of Edward Snowden, today we all awaited news from the Supreme Court on various cases, more importantly related to the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Proposition 8 decision.  As for Snowden, we have absolutely no idea where he’s at.  Apparently he never made his flight to Cuba and is MIA.  There is, however, David Gregory, who wants to arrest Glenn Greenwald and the Supreme Court ends up deciding to keep us all in absolute jitters by going another Monday without decisions on DOMA and Prop 8.

While we wait around for important outcomes of stories mentioned above or watching mainstream media ignore the important, non-sensationalist stuff, many of us sat through the torture of what we all call, the United States Senate.

Immigration reform has a better chance of passing Congress this year than any other year in my fifteen years of advocating for reform. Reasons are simple.  Latino’s scared the crap out of the Republican Party during the November elections, when an overwhelming amount of Latino voters came out in huge numbers, in support of President Obama.  While many of them voted, those who couldn’t vote encouraged friends and families who could, to do so with a simple request. Vote Democrat, because the likelihood is that they won’t say boneheaded things about your community.  So here we are.  President Barack Obama was reelected, the Senate remained a majority of Democrats, both insisting immigration reform was a priority and necessity.  The House, well…that’s a different story.

The Senate came up with its bill in April and after debates in the Judiciary committee, has finally made its way to the Senate floor for, up until Friday, we all believed that most of what many of us asked for (i.e. pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants) would stay in tact as it headed for the House for a debate. I mean, come on?  The Republican’s need to do what we’re asking from them, right?

Friday around noon, when all the Senator’s had left DC for their home states for the weekend, an amendment was introduced, now known as Corker-Hoeven, that overhauls border security in a way no one was expecting.  (womp womp)

Image

Courtesy of Center for American Progress

In 2012, the Department of Homeland Security reported that the border was as secure as it possibly could be.  Politically, however, we know that we can’t depend on Republican support without them insisting on more security. So the initial Gang of Eight bill not only provided for increased border security, but the President and Democrats made security a priority when the entire conversation began.  Well, I guess a “beefed” up border was not enough because what Corker introduced was border security on steroids.

The measure would double the total number of patrol agents and add more than 700 miles of fencing along the US-Mexico border at a cost of $38 billion.

As someone who follows Congress, I get that we have to compromise because that’s how our system works.  I get that our process makes it impossible for one party to dominate it all and pass exactly what their supporters expect.  But as an activist, who works day in and day out to defend and protect those that don’t have a voice, to what extent do we compromise and at whose expense?  When do we just stop handing over everything to the Republican Party, especially when they’ve been hijacked by extreme nativists who do not want immigration reform?

When the initial bill came out, a group of activists from across the state of New Mexico came together to develop a state platform and border security was one of the components we were worried about.  After speaking with New Mexico Senator Martin Heinrich, we insisted, and he agreed, that the border was as secure now as it ever will be. However, although we were very concerned with the discussion of border security back in April, in no way did we expect it to reach today’s levels.  Not at all.

So here is the question.  Do we end our mission for reform because of plan to militarize the border, creating a greater nightmare for all those living along the US/Mexican border? Or do we suck it up and move forward despite the fact that a pathway to citizenship will come at a very tough cost?

NEXT UP…THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

If today’s vote reflects anything we’ll see on Thursday on the Senate floor, it will head to the House.   But the question remains.  Will Speaker Boehnor get his group of Republican’s in the House of Representatives to support this plan and send it to the President for his signature?

Remember.  This Congress has done absolutely nothing when it comes to public policy and bi-partisanship in the last four years.  As awful as this updated immigration bill is, can we actually rely on Congress to get it to the President and sign it into law?

The next few days are crucial as Democrats seek out Republican’s to get those critical 70 votes in the Senate for a final vote on the floor.  Unless Senator Ted Cruz manages to coerce his Republican colleagues and convince them to agree with his awful justifications for denying 11 million people their turn for citizenship, the Senate bill should be heading to the House.

Republican Party: Immigration Reform? SIKE!

Living in conservative, southeastern New Mexico I am surrounded by a saturation of individuals from   an older generation.  Because of my surroundings, I frequently hear comments or am part of conversations in which this generation attempts to discredit the motives of my own generation and those younger than I.  Their observations claim that we have an inability to adequately “make a difference” in this nation, unlike the difference they made and seen only by those before us.

I blame Tom Brokaw for his enabling of the so-called “greatest generation.”

While my elders criticize our motives and perpetuate this notion that we don’t care, I’d like to deliver a strong message. We are a generation unwilling to conform to the standards set forth by those who have destroyed any hope of a promising future.   We will conduct ourselves in a way that we find satisfactory to our surroundings, not adhering to a certain recipe followed by those before us.  Instead, we will take things into our own hands and accomplish what we know is right…our way.

That being said, we are seeing youth taking to the streets all around the globe, including here at home.  We see it here at home where countless undocumented DREAMers, young people who have lived here for most of their lives, discarded any idea of following a political process because the idea of it is broken.  Instead, they are focused on finding alternative methods to remedying a really bad and jacked up system and it is unraveling before our eyes.  Look at all the states taking on drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants!  

This isn’t a coincidence.

Last summer, President Obama signed off on deferred action for the countless undocumented DREAMERs living in the country.  While many will continue to politicize the reasons why, thousands of activists took to the streets and to political offices all across the country and made deferred action possible.  The last few weeks we’ve seen the same level of intensity as the Senate takes on the immigration reform bill and even more so as debate hits the floor, possibly today.

Picture courtesy of the White House

President Obama and Vice President Biden met with activists in the Oval office last month.  But there is one important detail.  In order to enter the White House, you have to have certain documents to get in because the Secret Service has to do its necessary checks to obtain entry.  DREAMers, unless they’ve been given deferred action, cannot enter.  One individual did.  Justino, who has received deferred action, is from Los Angeles and has been advocating for immigration reform for as long as I’ve known him.  I know him through our training last year with New Organizing Institute and it was a great and awesome thing to see him at the White House, talking straight to the President, representing the countless millions and their families who can’t make it through those doors of the Oval Office.

Earlier this week, I asked Justino what it was like to be a part of this meeting with President Obama and Vice President Biden and his response was simple, yet direct:

It was an honor to have represented the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. The meeting would not have happened if the immigrant community, pro-immigrant rights organizations, and DREAMers had not organized, advocated, and mobilized for our rights like we did in the last decade. The meeting was a testament to our growing electoral power and influence in the legislative process, more specifically, in crafting the bill’s language.

We’ve been underestimated by those before us.

Yesterday we got word that Representative Raul Labrador pulled out of House talks to bring an immigration bill to the House floor.

Oh wait, but that’s not all.

Today, the Republican party, specifically, the great Representative of Iowa and sponsor, Steve King, introduced and passed a “self deport” bill in the House of Representatives, which in essence targets and defunds the DACA program signed by the President last year.

We’ve been underestimated by those before us.

What Justino is talking about is that a strong and large collective have come together to fight for immigration rights, including deferred action and have been doing so for over a decade.  It was successful because of unconventional thinking and organizing, which is leading the way to some great progress and we will be successful.

It will not be done like those before us.

Today’s vote on the House floor is a huge slap in the face to activists and youth across the country, but it in no way, deters the incredible strength in numbers, passion and conviction that the youth of this country have.

So, the next time an elder tells me that we are nothing like them.  I will respond with a simple, “no, we are not.”

SE New Mexico: The Drunk Uncle Who Is Never Invited To New Mexican Family Dinners

April 15, 2013 15 comments

Image Source: Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia

What story can I use from my own life experiences to apply to my organizing in hopes of connecting with the community that I’m trying to serve?

For the last 15 months, that’s a question I’ve been asking myself on a daily basis.  I’ve been working on my story of self and it’s been a major challenge.  As an organizer, it’s one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to work on because it’s a story I want my community to relate to and this is critical.

After months of thinking about my own story, it finally came to me a couple of weeks ago during my first class with Emerge New Mexico in Albuquerque.  I won’t elaborate on the specifics because I don’t want to give too much away, but the focal point of my story is me, sitting in front of the television at the age of nine years old, watching George H. W. Bush give his State of Union address and me translating what he’s saying to my monolingual, Spanish-speaking parents.  As a nine year old, translating the English language to my Spanish-speaking parents isn’t unprecedented.  Many families, who come from immigrant ancestry, either generations ago or just recently, experience this all the time.  It’s not a unique situation.  It does happen and in some places, it really pisses a lot of people off.

Roswell, New Mexico is one of those places.

As much as I love southeastern New Mexico, I can’t help but become overwhelmed with frustration knowing that a small fringe, help to define who we are as a community to the rest of the state.  Although more than half of Roswell’s population is Latino, according to the 2010 United States Census, and many of which speak Spanish, there is also a zero-tolerance attitude for diversity among a very small group of people living along the the Pecos Valley.

Today, my friend approached me and told me that his mother had an appointment at a doctor’s office here in Roswell.  His mother was shocked to find some questionable propaganda hanging from the door and walls of this particular doctor’s office, mostly geared to our Black President (shocker) but also a range of questionable English-only paraphernalia   Neither one of us was exactly sure how bad things were, so we decided to take a drive this afternoon, down to 1600 SE Main Street in Roswell.  Here, in Suite 3, is the office of Dr. Jackie Graham, MD and at the entrance of the office is this sign, which states,

No EnglishATTENTION ALL PATIENTS: 

We do not speak Spanish in this office.  If you do not speak English or have a qualified translator to help you, we have some requirements you must meet before being seen:

–  find a translator that speaks English well and will come to your appointment.

–  learn the language

If you cannot do either of these

– see another physician.

My apologies for the picture and its poor quality.  I took the picture with nervous hands, scared that someone from the office would come out with a loaded gun.  Because you know? We liberals are all out to get your guns.

On the right hand side of the flier is a very poor Spanish translation of what is stated on the left in English.

Dr. Graham, if you or your staff need any help with that translation, please feel free to contact me and I can help you out with that, ok?

Which brings me to my point.  Although I truly believe that my community has great potential because it is represented by a very diverse and wonderful group of citizenry who embrace the diversity that exists within our great state of New Mexico, we, unfortunately, also have some racists.  While some will be pretty blatant about it, others will go in the direction of Brad Paisely’s “Accidental Racist” mumbo jumbo and attempt to “defend” their racism and make excuses for it.

Bottom line is that racism exists in our community and people should be called out for it.

Let’s take Alaska Republican Congressman Don Young, for example.  Just a few weeks ago, he described workers at his father’s farm by saying, “My father had a ranch; we used to have 50-60 wetbacks to pick tomatos.”  He later apologized for using the slur, but defended it by saying, “it’s a term that was commonly used during my days growing up on a farm in Central California.”

By the way, if you’re sitting there not sure which word Congressman Young used as the “slur,” then you’re part of the problem.

Listen, I would love to live on the planet you’re living in if you think that racism died back in the 1960s.

It didn’t.

What I am writing to you today is real and it’s happening in our own community. A small minority of people in Roswell, wish to have things the way they were back in the day…when people of color and women were suppressed and old, white men made all the decisions.

This country is diverse and will continue to evolve into a more diverse nation as more immigrants come into this great nation.  There are tens, if not hundreds of languages being spoken in this country each and everyday because every nation on earth is represented in our communities, and that is a beautiful thing. But while I think this is incredibly awesome, we have the Dr. Graham’s of the world who are frightened by this idea of an “invasion of foreigners,” who will trounce on the greatness that is “Americuh” and turn it into the third world country they left behind.

This is false.

Because it’s the Dr. Graham’s of the world, who remind me every day, that while they spew their hate, intolerance and ignorance, it’s also a dying fad.  There will be a time when our children and grandchildren will never understand or comprehend how any of this could have even been possible because they will not define a person based on their race, color, gender, language, sexual orientation or creed.  Instead, they will define a person on the content of their character.  A philosophy that may not hold true today in Dr. Graham’s office, but does in the hearts and minds of countless others in our community, which will hopefully sustain our humanity for generations to come.

Pathway To Citizenship for 11 Million: Dead On Arrival Or Inevitable?

I’m been following the immigrant rights movement since 2000 or so.  However, my interest in the movement peaked in 2006 while I was in Los Angeles and it has been of great interest to me ever since.  As an activist and an organizer, I am 100% committed to a pathway to  citizenship for all 11 million undocumented immigrants here in the United States.  It is absolutely the right thing to do.  But as the Senate’s Gang of Eight release the first draft of the immigration bill on Tuesday, as a blogger and social media person who spends a lot of time following those within the movement, I can’t help but wonder what the responses will be from them once the bill is released. Massive disappointment?  Or a great place to start?

Although I’m optimistic, as a blogger and social media person observing the movement from the outside, I am also worried.  A year ago I could see a very tense and divided movement.  On the one hand you had activists coming out for building on the foundation of working with Congress to pass something meaningful, continuing the work from previous years and attempting to show a solid bi-partisan commitment to reform.  But on the other hand, you had activists who were not happy with the results of 2006 and beyond and they split, moving forward with a more radical and non-traditional form of protest against the political status quo.  Civil disobedience (which many of us would agree is what led to President Obama signing off on deferred action for DREAMers) is what many feel was necessary to hold the Obama Administration and Democrats and Republican’s alike, accountable, but it was also an attempt to go about the issue of immigrant rights to a completely different level.  Why focus on the political and pushing policy when we know Congress doesn’t function?  Why should we wait on the government to do anything?

Steps were taken to move in a different direction by the latter group and many of us, especially me, felt compelled to give these young DREAMers props for what they were doing.  No longer were they interested in doing things the “traditional” way, but instead spent days protesting in President Obama’s campaign offices across the country or risked their lives by purposely getting arrested and put into deportation proceedings to show the world how brutal detention facilities are across the country.

Now, while all of these examples show incredible bravery and have helped to shift the momentum for youth pushing for a pathway to citizenship for all, I can’t help but wonder how these two different methods from two sectors within the movement (with similar goals) will affect the conversation in the coming weeks.  A year ago I wasn’t worried.  A year ago I felt that things were moving in a separate but productive and effective process and that at some point after the election, these two ideologies would manage to come to fruition.  But in recent weeks, my observation is that this is not the case.  These two philosophies are coming head to head with one another and challenging chances for real reform.  We’re facing a devastating shift in momentum which could lead to much less than what we are bargaining for.

This is the United State of America and we know very well that our Congress cannot agree on anything and hasn’t during the last four years.  However, since the election in November things looked different in terms of immigration.  We had both sides of the political spectrum seeing the impact of Latino turnout and we were confident that policy makers understood our commitment to seeing reform through, capitalizing on what we stand strongly for.  But with the school shooting in Connecticut, the ongoing debate of gun control, in conjunction with the sequester and this division among the movement which I have been observing, makes me feel extremely worried about the prospects of immigration reform this year…

or at least being satisfied with a good foundation.

Soon after the the Gang of Eight introduces its bill on Tuesday and after all the amendments have been added to the bill and after all the debating and politicizing of the issue is made by both sides, will we again be disappointed like we were in the past or have the differences of methods among the immigrant rights movement laid the groundwork for something much more promising than even I have ever expected?

We’ll find out on Tuesday.